Archive for the ‘Golf’s Book’ Category

Golfer’s Books

GOLF DREAMS: WRITINGS ON GOLF by John Updike.GOLF DREAMS

No other writer brings the pain and the pleasure of golf to life as intensely and as exquisitely as John Updike. In this compilation of pub­lished essays and excerpts from his works of fiction, Updike portrays himself and his characters as morose, gloomy and immersed in a futile, maddening pastime (a topic addressed in “Is Life Too Short for Golf?”).

While it has an indisputably male perspective, Golf Dreams is worth reading for the beauty and originality of its language—Updike’s description of making a great shot in “Tips on a Trip” should be read aloud. Our favorite chapter is “Women’s Work,” a fascinating glimpse into a man’s thoughts on watching women compete, origi­nally published in the program for the 1984 U.S. Women’s Open. While other great writers of the 20th century didn’t bother to veil their misogyny, Updike writes of his awe of the players, whom he compares to Amazon warriors “doing authen­tic battle.” Read the rest of this entry »

Golfer Review – Books

EVERY SHOT MUST HAVE A PURPOSE by Pia Nilsson and Lynn Marriott, with Ron Sirak.EVERY SHOT MUST HAVE A PURPOSE

If you are looking for a golf instruction book that takes a more holistic approach, this is it. Pia Nilsson, a former coach of the Swedish National Golf Team, adopted her teaching methods to instill her players with a deeper will to win. She and teaching pro Lynn Marriott, both GFW contributors, have produced a revolutionary way to learn that they call GOLF 54.
(Some golfers claimed to have dropped 10 strokes after reading the book.) These lessons apply to
life as much as to golf. For example, Nilsson and Marriott advise readers to learn to control what they
can (attitude, diet, commitment) and leave the rest (weather, playing partners) to take care of itself. Read the rest of this entry »

Summer Reader – Golf Books

THE BOGEY MAN by George Plimpton.THE BOGEY MAN

A beloved figure in the lit­erary world and a founding editor of The Paris Review, Plimpton became famous in the 1960s for trying his hand at such profes­sional sports as NFL football and major league baseball—and living writing for Hollywood. But he loved golf and wrote prolifically on the subject.

In this collection of tales about a fictional golf club, his female characters are as entertaining as the male ones. There’s the low- handicapper Jane, whose romantic musings about her fiancé, William, include the delight she takes in his nearly equal handicap. And then there’s the club champion Agnes Flack, who hits it 240 yards and never lets a touch of rain put her off her game.

In the deliciously absurd “Feet of Clay” the final round of the Women’s Singles Championship involves a thunderstorm, a Pekinese and an “expensively uphol­stered” Lulabelle Sprockett, heir to Sprockett’s Superfine Sardines. Read the rest of this entry »