Posts Tagged ‘Junior’

Professional Training – Strike The Ball

Training 1Most of the short-game shots, including the chip, is to get the club-head to hit the ball first and bottom out on the target side of it. If you do that consis­tently, you’ll have excellent distance control. When playing a normal chip shot (more roll, less carry), make sure your shoulders are level at address.

(Sometimes it helps to feel as if your left shoulder is pointing toward the ground.) Amateurs often tilt their left shoulder upward, as if they were playing a full shot, which causes the club-head to bot­tom out behind the ball and hit it fat or thin. Place the ball slightly back in your stance and shift your weight to your left side. This will promote a steeper, more descending down­swing and the proper ball-turf contact for a solid shot. Read the rest of this entry »

Golf Bag

SUN MOUNTAIN SUPERLIGHT 3.5 WITH HUG TECHNOLOGY sunmountain golf bag

Weighing in at less than four pounds, this new bag features a unique padded aluminum arm that fits snugly around your waist, transfer­ring most of its weight from your shoulders to your hips.

OGIO DIVAogio diva golf bag

Another featherweight at just over four pounds, the Diva has an innovative top
that keeps each wood separate for easy access. With a comfortable double strap and eight pockets, it’s everything a girl could want.

NIKE XTREME SPORTnike golf bag

This five-pound women’s bag features a double strap that becomes a single strap with a simple click. Extras include seven roomy pockets, a sturdy stand and six-way, full-length club dividers.

Tactic to use a fairway wood instead of an iron

chopping ball 1I don’t always hit the fairway with my drives. But rather than muscle a 5- or 6-iron out of the rough, I prefer to use my highest-lofted wood (7-wood) and play a long punch-and-run shot, landing the ball short of the green and letting it run up.

There are several advantages to hitting a wood or hybrid from the rough. A wood is lighter, so you can generate more club- head speed—crucial to getting the ball out of the deep grass; it has a wider sole than an iron, which allows the club-head to glide through the grass more easily; and the shallow clubface and lower, deeper center of gravity make it easier to launch the ball into the air.

Try using a wood the next time you find yourself in moderate rough more than a 9-iron distance from the flag. Make sure the front of the green is open and try to land the ball about 20 yards short of the green, chasing it up toward the hole. Read the rest of this entry »

Annika Academy

annika academy 4Train like an elite athlete at the ANNIKA Academy at Ginn Reunion Resort in Orlando. The Academy’s holistic approach allows you to hone your golf skills with individual instruction from Annika’s personal swing coach, Henri Reis, and boost your fitness and nutrition programs with the help of her personal trainer, Kai Fusser. Select packages even include mental- game preparation with Pia Nilsson and Lynn Marriott. For the ultimate learning experience, attend a group clinic with Annika or play nine holes with the legend herself. Read the rest of this entry »

Summer Reader – Golf Books

THE BOGEY MAN by George Plimpton.THE BOGEY MAN

A beloved figure in the lit­erary world and a founding editor of The Paris Review, Plimpton became famous in the 1960s for trying his hand at such profes­sional sports as NFL football and major league baseball—and living writing for Hollywood. But he loved golf and wrote prolifically on the subject.

In this collection of tales about a fictional golf club, his female characters are as entertaining as the male ones. There’s the low- handicapper Jane, whose romantic musings about her fiancé, William, include the delight she takes in his nearly equal handicap. And then there’s the club champion Agnes Flack, who hits it 240 yards and never lets a touch of rain put her off her game.

In the deliciously absurd “Feet of Clay” the final round of the Women’s Singles Championship involves a thunderstorm, a Pekinese and an “expensively uphol­stered” Lulabelle Sprockett, heir to Sprockett’s Superfine Sardines. Read the rest of this entry »