Posts Tagged ‘Wood Club’

Professional Training – Strike The Ball

Training 1Most of the short-game shots, including the chip, is to get the club-head to hit the ball first and bottom out on the target side of it. If you do that consis­tently, you’ll have excellent distance control. When playing a normal chip shot (more roll, less carry), make sure your shoulders are level at address.

(Sometimes it helps to feel as if your left shoulder is pointing toward the ground.) Amateurs often tilt their left shoulder upward, as if they were playing a full shot, which causes the club-head to bot­tom out behind the ball and hit it fat or thin. Place the ball slightly back in your stance and shift your weight to your left side. This will promote a steeper, more descending down­swing and the proper ball-turf contact for a solid shot. Read the rest of this entry »

Golfer’s Books

GOLF DREAMS: WRITINGS ON GOLF by John Updike.GOLF DREAMS

No other writer brings the pain and the pleasure of golf to life as intensely and as exquisitely as John Updike. In this compilation of pub­lished essays and excerpts from his works of fiction, Updike portrays himself and his characters as morose, gloomy and immersed in a futile, maddening pastime (a topic addressed in “Is Life Too Short for Golf?”).

While it has an indisputably male perspective, Golf Dreams is worth reading for the beauty and originality of its language—Updike’s description of making a great shot in “Tips on a Trip” should be read aloud. Our favorite chapter is “Women’s Work,” a fascinating glimpse into a man’s thoughts on watching women compete, origi­nally published in the program for the 1984 U.S. Women’s Open. While other great writers of the 20th century didn’t bother to veil their misogyny, Updike writes of his awe of the players, whom he compares to Amazon warriors “doing authen­tic battle.” Read the rest of this entry »

Tactic to use a fairway wood instead of an iron

chopping ball 1I don’t always hit the fairway with my drives. But rather than muscle a 5- or 6-iron out of the rough, I prefer to use my highest-lofted wood (7-wood) and play a long punch-and-run shot, landing the ball short of the green and letting it run up.

There are several advantages to hitting a wood or hybrid from the rough. A wood is lighter, so you can generate more club- head speed—crucial to getting the ball out of the deep grass; it has a wider sole than an iron, which allows the club-head to glide through the grass more easily; and the shallow clubface and lower, deeper center of gravity make it easier to launch the ball into the air.

Try using a wood the next time you find yourself in moderate rough more than a 9-iron distance from the flag. Make sure the front of the green is open and try to land the ball about 20 yards short of the green, chasing it up toward the hole. Read the rest of this entry »